The 10 best all-black architectural structures for lovers of minimal and bold design

Black is a really strong and powerful color that most of us often run away from! Especially when it comes to using it in our homes. However, when implemented correctly, black can radiate a very modern and minimal feel, creating an aesthetic that instantly makes you feel calm and balanced. From an all-black house with a tree running through the center to a floating cabin that disappears into a hilly landscape – this collection of all-black architectural structures is proof that, when used boldly but intelligently, black aesthetics can be a pleasure. I love these clean and minimal designs. And you? Are you an all-black architecture team too?

1. Twin sisters

Iranian architect Milad Eshtiyaghi is known for his quirky yet majestic structures. His designs of him are anything but ordinary and will leave you wondering how he ever got such an idea! One of these mesmerizing structures I came across recently was the “Twin Sisters”. Located in Mārupe, Latvia, the house was inspired by twin sisters, who literally live up to his name.

Why is it noteworthy?

The clients were twin sisters, who approached Eshtiyaghi to create a two-unit powered house for them. They wanted one unit to be placed upstairs, while the lower unit would be placed downstairs. Eshtiyaghi has decided to satisfy the customer’s needs in his unique and interesting way! He wanted to build a house that, in addition to satisfying their needs, also represented the fact that inside him there are twin sisters.

What we like

  • The structures are separated right in the center by a courtyard, with a tree placed in the center
  • The climatic conditions of Latvia also affected the inclined shape

What we don’t like

2. House in the forest

Immersed in the island of Bowen, in British Colombia, is a beautiful cabin in the woods designed by SM Studio. Called the Forest House, the cabin is deeply influenced by SM Studio’s philosophy of creating sustainable, low-energy homes that are built with minimal disturbance to the site they are in.

Why is it noteworthy?

SM Studio, based in Vancouver, has lifted the traditional cabin shape and given it a more contemporary and modernized look. Surrounded by Douglas firs and elevated above the rocky landscape, the Forest House is definitely a long way from the usual cabins we encounter. In an effort to reduce the impact of the house on the forest floor, SM Studio designed it as a bridge, connecting two massive outcrops, leaving the space below quite free and minimizing the need to create a foundation on the rocks.

What we like

  • Built maintaining a serene relationship with the surrounding landscape
  • It supports a slower life

What we don’t like

  • The house can only accommodate 3 people, so it can be considered a small space for some families

3. The KE01 Refuge


Le Refuge KE01 is a black log cabin near the coast of Keremma, France, built by Gayet Roger Architects to serve as a vacation home for the family of the company’s co-founders.

Why is it noteworthy?

Designed to be the ultimate haven for relaxation and rest, Le Refuge KE01 is a small black wood cabin with a warm interior by Gayet Roger Architects. Led by the studio’s co-founders, Anne and Aldric Gayet, the project was initially conceived to be an idyllic vacation home for the architects’ family. Measuring 850 square feet, the black wood cabin was built in harmony with the surrounding landscape to withstand all sorts of weather conditions.

What we like

  • A spacious and wraparound deck offers a lounge area on days when the weather permits
  • The interior of the home exudes a nest-like quality with a warm, raw spruce finish

What we don’t like

4. The Nokken cabin


Called Nokken Cabin, these pre-made cabins can be purchased by anyone, but the designer duo has bigger projects for them. They want groups of them to be placed in beautiful and remote locations to create “landscaped hotels” that can offer a luxurious glamping experience. You would be able to connect with nature and relax, but in a comfortable and welcoming space, without having to rough it at the bottom.

Why is it noteworthy?

The Nokken Cabin was created with the purpose of expanding and had to be a rather flexible structure. It can be used as a travel lodging, workspace, retail item, spa, restaurant, or even as a simple home.

What we like

  • A beautiful panoramic window in front of the bed offers a surreal view of the landscape.

What we don’t like

  • While we love the minimal black structure, it would be great if there was an optional open space / terrace to better appreciate the surroundings

5. The Buck Mountain Cabin


Located on the island of Orcas, which is part of an archipelago called the San Juan Islands, is the Buck Mountain Cabin. The beautiful cedar-clad cabin was built by embracing the original site and its condition and ensuring that minimal disturbance was caused there. A steep slope and a narrow clearing created by a rocky outcrop were some of the challenges faced by the architects, but they encouraged clients to focus on these features as they are unique to San Juan.

Why is it noteworthy?

Grassy basalt rock outcrops within a Douglas fir and Pacific madrone forest were used to enhance and elevate the cabin. The east side of the 1527 square foot cabin is anchored to a spur, while the west side is interesting cantilevered over the entire site, nearly 22 feet above the ground, and offers great views of the surrounding landscape. The large trees around the site were not cut down which also ensured that the site was minimally disturbed. The addition of cantilevers and point-loading wooden columns with small bases also helped this cause.

What we like

  • Large protective overhangs and south-facing free-level windows allow sunlight to enter generously, especially during winter
  • A gorgeous patio floats on the site and is accessed via a glass door

What we don’t like

6. The passive house Hütt 01


Melbourne Design Studios redesigned a nearly forgotten residence in the middle of Melbourne and named it The Hütt 01 Passive House. The house was created to be a regenerative design and is a certified ‘Premium’ Passivhouse, which is the highest category of Passivhaus, and essentially produces more energy than it consumes.

Why is it noteworthy?

Also called “TMRW by Hütt: A Beacon of Hope for the Future” by the architects, the house is intended to be an oasis of peace in the otherwise hectic urban jungle called Melbourne. It is located on a plot of 250 square meters, which has a rather interesting shape like a wedge. It has an extremely industrial feel and is accessed via a blue stone lane. The house occupies a compact space of 78 square meters but is spread over two and a half levels.

What we like

  • All bricks were purchased and rescued from demolition sites across Melbourne
  • Minor finishing and plastering materials were used

What we don’t like

7. The Boundary Point Cabin


Ethereally floating above a lake in British Columbia, the Boundary Point Cabin was designed by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson as a vacation home for an extended family who can get together and spend the summer every year. Perched on the side of the hill, on a rocky spur, the hut has an intriguing wedge shape, which allows it to integrate harmoniously with its landscape.

Why is it noteworthy?

The 2500 square foot home was built in 2020 on a slope marked by beautiful trees, from Douglas firs to cedars and pines. It features black cedar siding that allows the house to simply blend in with the trees that surround it, creating a living space that is completely at one with its surroundings. The original cabin was rather modest and rustic and has been transformed by Jackson into a contemporary cabin with floor-to-ceiling wood paneling and narrow angled slats.

What we like

  • The cabin has been designed to allow residents to always stay in touch with nature
  • The inside of the house is an interesting contrast to the outside

What we don’t like

8. House ZZZ


Montevideo-based architecture firm iHouse builds prefabricated homes using the latest dry construction methods currently trending on the international stage. With only 70 days to build a house for Conrado, a Uruguayan living in London, on his family’s Cologne property, iHouse was well equipped to tackle the project. Formed by the merger of two modules, Casa ZGZ was built off-site and then installed on the family property in just five days.

Why is it noteworthy?

As Colonia is one of the oldest cities in Uruguay, the team behind Casa ZGZ hoped to maintain the spirit of the region’s historic architecture by modernizing the cabin to meet modern needs. The one-level residence is dressed in black in an attempt to hide the house in plain sight among the many elements of nature that surround it. The black exterior also warms the home’s wooden interior, which is clad with Forest Stewardship Council certified wood paneling.

What we like

  • Minimizing the impact of the house on the environment and on the territory of the region, Casa ZGZ was built off-site in two modules
  • It coexists in harmony with a space that is foreign to its language

What we don’t like

  • He could have been gifted with another story

9. Matt and Lisa’s little house


Nestled high above an Australian forest, Matt and Lisa’s tiny two-story house was built by the couple with the help of some friends.

Why is it noteworthy?

The small house’s black metal cladding certainly stands out, but amid the tall tops of the eucalyptus trees, it offers a less flashy charm, artfully tying it with recycled hardwood finishes for the house’s overhanging gables. Matt and Lisa’s house on wheels measures nearly 30 feet long and only about eight feet wide – the ceiling reaches a height of 14 feet, slightly above average for the conventional tiny house. But then the tiny houses are anything but conventional. Coming from a bricklayer’s past, the couple brought modern amenities such as cable, electricity, and running water to their small home, as well as some outdoor games like running an attacked cat.

What we like

  • Impressive high ceilings
  • Full size kitchen

What we don’t like

  • People may prefer a more compact little house

10. The house of chestnuts


Located in Vale Flor, Portugal, Chestnut House is a minimalist house designed by local architect João Mendes Ribeiro, centered around a chestnut tree. The glass walls of the house offer close-up views of the majestic tree, making it appear that the tree is part of the house. The house is clad in black painted wood and also lined with plywood panels.

Why is it noteworthy?

Defined as an “elegant refuge”, the house occupies an area of ​​25 square meters and includes a kitchen, a living area and a sleeping area, all located within a single environment. A central fireplace is placed in the center of the room. The walls of this room are positioned in such a way as to subtly wrap and embrace the chestnut.

What we like

  • The interiors integrate perfectly and, in fact, accentuate the minimal exterior of the house
  • By incorporating and making room for an existing tree in the design of the house, Ribeiro was able to minimize the disturbance caused to the site.

What we don’t like

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *